Sublime Text 2 is a text editor for OS X, Linux and Windows, currently in beta.

+2
lionel delbé 5 years ago in Plugin announcements • updated by Stephen Gennard 3 years ago 2
cobol is one of the most use language in professionnal world. And you developper are facing serious performance issue working with non modern iDE  (auto syntax etc...)
+2
Brian Clapper 5 years ago in Plugin announcements • updated by Kai Grossjohann 5 years ago 1
GNU Emacs has a useful feature that allows an individual file to override the default Emacs mode (and, hence, the associated language syntax and colorization) by using a special magic string somewhere in the first non-blank line of the file. For instance, if file foo.C would normally be displayed using C syntax rules, but you want to force Sublime Text 2 to use C++ rules, simply include a comment like this in the first non-blank line of the file:

//           -*- c++ -*-

This feature is useful for overriding the default language on a per-file basis.

I've implemented a plugin that provides this capability. It's in this GitHub repo:
+2

GAMS is a widely used modelling language to write optimization model.

I wrote a plugin for syntax highlighting and compilation command.

The repository is located in github: https://github.com/lolow/sublime-gams


+1

The regular expression for matching the xml tag localname isn't correctly.

the '.' is allowed in the localname so the correct expression should be:


(</?)(?:([-_a-zA-Z0-9]+)((:)))?([-_a-zA-Z0-9:\.]+)


If have simply added the \. in the last group ... could you please add this in the XML.tmLanguage file THX ...


And: Sublime text is amazing! I will purchase a licence for Xmas for ME ;)

+1
Armin Karner 4 years ago in Plugin announcements 0

Hello,

I'd like to import mysql.connector to get a connection to my db. The problem is that the integrated Python of Sublime Text 2 is 2.x (too old for that module as Oracle told me) so I downloaded Sublime Text 3 as it has an integrated Python 3.x. In the normal Python 3.x IDLE and command line, mysql.connector is working, but not via the Console in Sublime. 

Is there some module or a package to solve my problem?

Please help me.

Thank you very much.

-Armin

+1
Anshen 4 years ago in Plugin announcements 0

You kown, support it.

+1
Marek Tomko 5 years ago in Plugin announcements 0
I have many problems with 2181 build, that are making Sublime Text 2 unusable anymore. 
For example word wrap can't be turned off, even if I make it false in default settings. 
Or Undo is not working correctly at all. I can't use it, because when I did, it would corrupt a part of code, which wasn't even changed. 
Or sometimes I can't use CTRL+X because it will not delete selected part.
And cursor very often just stays on one spot and don't move (he do, but I don't see it). That's maybe the worst.

Build 2165 was perfect and I was very happy. I tried 2181 in February, but when I had saw these defects, I returned to 2165. But unfortunately a few weeks ago Sublime Text 2 said that 2165 is not enabled any more and I have to switch to newer build.

I'm running on Ubuntu 10.10.

I know that this forum is about plugins, maybe, but I don't have an interest to register on your forum. 
0

We’ve talked about the post-post-crisis era as one that is neither risk-off (a period like the financial crisis, when investors shun riskier assets) nor risk-on (a period like the post-crisis period, which we define from March 2009 through November 2014, when investors embrace riskier assets). In a post-post-crisis landscape, markets have a mixed outlook, in which growth is uneven and interest rates remain low.


The Taper Tantrum vs. the Recent Rise in Yields

In 2013, the “Taper Tantrum” occurred when the market learned that the US Federal Reserve planned to wind down its quantitative easing program — signaling the end of monetary policy easing and the beginning of a shift toward monetary policy tightening. Consequently, Treasury yields rose 100 basis points over two months. The move higher in yields seemed like a reasonable reaction to such signaling.

The recent move in interest rates also makes sense. The market is taking several things into consideration:

1. Uncertainty about the leadership of the Fed. Janet Yellen’s term as chair is due to end in February 2018. Given the Fed’s dovish policy during her tenure, the market is fearful that Trump will appoint a more hawkish leader who is more eager to raise interest rates and reset the tone.

2. Looser fiscal policy. Trump has championed both lower taxes and higher infrastructure spending. These policies, if implemented, would likely boost gross domestic product and increase the federal budget deficit.

3. Higher inflation prospects. Looser fiscal policy should be a tailwind for inflation. In addition, any protectionist policies, such as amending the North American Free Trade Agreement or implementing tariffs, could cause prices to move higher.

Bond Fundamentals Moving Forward

On one hand, lower taxes, fiscal stimulus and deregulation are all positive factors for riskier assets like stocks (and by extension negative for safer assets like Treasuries). But there are still many uncertainties and other factors that provide reasons to be constructive on fixed income:

1. Uncertain geopolitical backdrop. China is currently growing at a reasonably healthy pace, but that has been aided by a rapid expansion in credit.

2. Uncertain U.S. government policy. To paraphrase Aristotle, the market abhors a vacuum. Following the election, many aspects of government policy are in flux, from spending plans to foreign relations.

3. Risk that fiscal stimulus plans miss their target. The nonpartisan Tax Policy Center’s analysis of Trump’s income tax plan finds that, while high-income taxpayers would enjoy most of his proposed tax savings, middle-income families would receive an average tax cut of $1,000.

4. Risk of a trade war harming growth. If Trump were to follow through on his proposals to increase tariffs on foreign goods, his actions could spiral into a trade war. This would be negative for U.S. GDP growth.

5. Risk of restrictions on immigration hurting economic growth. One little-known fact is that the growth in GDP per capita has trailed total GDP growth by 40% since the financial crisis.

6. Risk of a shock hitting the economy. External shocks are, by nature, difficult to predict but can have wide-ranging effects.

7. Large number of buyers of U.S. government debt. U.S. and foreign pension funds and insurers use Treasuries as an important component of their portfolios, and this shows no sign of changing.

What This Means for Investors

Although it seems very likely to us that the Fed will raise rates gradually in years to come, expected risk-adjusted returns for investing in bonds remain appealing. Recent volatility in the municipal bond market is beginning to present more opportunities for munis*, while healthier realized inflation makes us continue to be supportive of Treasury Inflation-Protected Securities.
0

We’ve talked about the post-post-crisis era as one that is neither risk-off (a period like the financial crisis, when investors shun riskier assets) nor risk-on (a period like the post-crisis period, which we define from March 2009 through November 2014, when investors embrace riskier assets). In a post-post-crisis landscape, markets have a mixed outlook, in which growth is uneven and interest rates remain low.


The Taper Tantrum vs. the Recent Rise in Yields

In 2013, the “Taper Tantrum” occurred when the market learned that the US Federal Reserve planned to wind down its quantitative easing program — signaling the end of monetary policy easing and the beginning of a shift toward monetary policy tightening. Consequently, Treasury yields rose 100 basis points over two months. The move higher in yields seemed like a reasonable reaction to such signaling.

The recent move in interest rates also makes sense. The market is taking several things into consideration:

1. Uncertainty about the leadership of the Fed. Janet Yellen’s term as chair is due to end in February 2018. Given the Fed’s dovish policy during her tenure, the market is fearful that Trump will appoint a more hawkish leader who is more eager to raise interest rates and reset the tone.

2. Looser fiscal policy. Trump has championed both lower taxes and higher infrastructure spending. These policies, if implemented, would likely boost gross domestic product and increase the federal budget deficit.

3. Higher inflation prospects. Looser fiscal policy should be a tailwind for inflation. In addition, any protectionist policies, such as amending the North American Free Trade Agreement or implementing tariffs, could cause prices to move higher.

Bond Fundamentals Moving Forward

On one hand, lower taxes, fiscal stimulus and deregulation are all positive factors for riskier assets like stocks (and by extension negative for safer assets like Treasuries). But there are still many uncertainties and other factors that provide reasons to be constructive on fixed income:

1. Uncertain geopolitical backdrop. China is currently growing at a reasonably healthy pace, but that has been aided by a rapid expansion in credit.

2. Uncertain U.S. government policy. To paraphrase Aristotle, the market abhors a vacuum. Following the election, many aspects of government policy are in flux, from spending plans to foreign relations.

3. Risk that fiscal stimulus plans miss their target. The nonpartisan Tax Policy Center’s analysis of Trump’s income tax plan finds that, while high-income taxpayers would enjoy most of his proposed tax savings, middle-income families would receive an average tax cut of $1,000.

4. Risk of a trade war harming growth. If Trump were to follow through on his proposals to increase tariffs on foreign goods, his actions could spiral into a trade war. This would be negative for U.S. GDP growth.

5. Risk of restrictions on immigration hurting economic growth. One little-known fact is that the growth in GDP per capita has trailed total GDP growth by 40% since the financial crisis.

6. Risk of a shock hitting the economy. External shocks are, by nature, difficult to predict but can have wide-ranging effects.

7. Large number of buyers of U.S. government debt. U.S. and foreign pension funds and insurers use Treasuries as an important component of their portfolios, and this shows no sign of changing.

What This Means for Investors

Although it seems very likely to us that the Fed will raise rates gradually in years to come, expected risk-adjusted returns for investing in bonds remain appealing. Recent volatility in the municipal bond market is beginning to present more opportunities for munis*, while healthier realized inflation makes us continue to be supportive of Treasury Inflation-Protected Securities.
0

#1: Uncertainty Is a Sure Thing. Keep Calm and Carry On.


When it comes to shock and awe, 2016 delivered. The United Kingdom’s decision to leave the European Union, the election of Donald Trump as president of the United States, turmoil in China’s markets, challenges to globalization — clearly, the world remains an uncertain place.
Swift and dramatic change can inspire powerful emotions and lead to very human, but ultimately destructive, investment decisions. For investors confronted with confusion and uncertainty, the natural temptation is to retreat. “Keep calm and carry on” may be good advice, but for many investors it can be hard to follow.

#2: Diversification Still Matters, So Keep Your Balance.
In the 2008-2009 bear market, diversification didn’t matter. The Great Recession took a toll on nearly every asset class and portfolio. But in the 2000-2002 downturn, diversification worked. If you hadn’t piled into tech, you were spared a lot of pain when the dot-com bubble burst.
The debate over investment diversification is likely to go on and on, but today a strategic allocation in stocks and bonds around the world remains a hallmark of a portfolio that can help investors fulfill their objectives in the long run.

#3: Income is Scarce. Casting a Wide Net Can Pay Dividends.

There are nearly 50 million people over 65 in the United States, and many of them have one thing in common: They want their dividends. Millions of retiring baby boomers need income, but they may have to search far and wide for yield.


#4: Relax, It’s Not All Doom and Gloom.
Take a deep breath. Relax. In an age when doom and gloom seem to be all we read about or see on television, it just might be possible that things aren’t as bad as they seem. In fact, things may just be getting better — and not for the few, but for the many.

#5: Life Happens. Control What You Can With a Long-Range Plan.

Don’t get too high or too low. Try to maintain an even keel. Fight fear with facts.

All of those can be hard to do when the world’s markets and global economy are going through times that can be both exhilarating and frightening. The evidence shows that euphoric investors tend to buy high, and fearful investors sell low.